FLYING AS A CABIN CREW


Air Cabin Crew members provide excellent customer service to passengers while ensuring their comfort and safety throughout the flight. Crew are trained to deal with security and emergency situations which may arise and can administer first aid to passengers.
Cabin Crew is everyone that works on board an aircraft. Flight Attendants, Senior Flight Attendants, Pursers, On board chefs – all of them are part of the Cabin Crew. They are all a part of the team that is responsible for your well-being on a flight
The role of a flight attendant is to "provide routine services and respond to emergencies to ensure the safety and comfort of airline passengers while aboard planes". However, particularly in the USA flight attendants often state that they are there "primarily for [the passenger's] safety". Typically, flight attendants require holding a high school diploma or equivalent, and in the USA the median annual wage for flight attendants was $50,500 in May 2017, higher than the median for all workers of $37,690.
The number of flight attendants required on flights is mandated by each country's regulations. In the USA, for light planes with 19 or less seats, or, if weighing more than 7,500 pounds, 9 or less seats, no flight attendant is needed; on larger aircraft, one flight attendant per 50 passenger seats is required.
The majority of flight attendants for most airlines are female, though a substantial number of males have entered the industry since 1980

Prior to each flight, flight attendants attend a safety briefing with the pilots and lead flight attendant. During this briefing, they go over safety and emergency checklists, the locations and amounts of emergency equipment and other features specific to that aircraft type. Boarding particulars are verified, such as special needs passengers, small children travelling as unaccompanied or VIPs. Weather conditions are discussed including anticipated turbulence. Prior to each flight a safety check is conducted to ensure all equipment such as life-veststorches (flashlights) and firefighting equipment are on board, in the right quantity, and in proper condition. They must monitor the cabin for any unusual smells or situations. They assist with the loading of carry-on baggage, checking for weight, size and dangerous goods. They make sure those sitting in emergency exit rows are willing and able to assist in an evacuation and move those who are not willing or able out of the row into another seat. They then must do a safety demonstration or monitor passengers as they watch a safety video. They then must "secure the cabin" ensuring tray tables are stowed, seats are in their upright positions, armrests down and carry-nos stowed correctly and seat belts are fastened prior to take-off. All the service between boarding and take-off is called Pre-Take off Service.
Once up in the air, flight attendants will usually serve drinks and/or food to passengers using an airline service trolley. When not performing customer service duties, flight attendants must periodically conduct cabin checks and listen for any unusual noises or situations. Checks must also be done on the lavatory to ensure the smoke detector hasn't been disabled or destroyed and to restock supplies as needed. Regular cockpit checks must be done to ensure the health and safety of the pilot(s). They must also respond to call lights dealing with special requests. During turbulence, flight attendants must ensure the cabin is secure. Prior to landing, all loose items, trays and rubbish must be collected and secured along with service and galley equipment. All hot liquids must be disposed of. A final cabin check must then be completed prior to landing. It is vital that flight attendants remain aware as the majority of emergencies occur during take-off and landing. Upon landing, flight attendants must remain stationed at exits and monitor the air plane and cabin as passengers disembark the plane. They also assist any special needs passengers and small children off the air plane and escort children, while following the proper paperwork and ID process to escort them to the designated person picking them up.
Flight attendants are trained to deal with a wide variety of emergencies, and are trained in first aid. More frequent situations may include a bleeding nose, illness, small injuries, intoxicated passengers, aggressive and anxiety-stricken passengers. Emergency training includes rejected take-offsemergency landings, cardiac and in-flight medical situations, smoke in the cabin, fires, depressurization, on-board births and deaths, dangerous goods and spills in the cabin, emergency evacuationshijackings, and water landings.

Yashashree Bhorkar (MBA)
Aviation HR Intern




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